absentee ballot for overseas voter

Submissions


In 2004, many people offered to contribute Web pages to the site. A few were even put up. That is also possible this time. Here are some guidelines. The assumption here that anyone attempting this knows something about computers and Web page design and can handle terms like CSS stylesheets, PHP, JavaScript, and cron daemons without missing a beat. Ideas are welcome from anyone, but going from an idea to a Web page requires actual work.

  • The main site runs on a dedicated Linux server in upstate New York. It is entirely devoid of Microsoft software. The whole software package consists of about 800 lines of UNIX shell script and 300 lines of PHP. building the site is completely automatic once the polling and blog files have been uploaded. The shell script is started by the cron daemon periodically to check if all the input is available, and if so, builds the site.
  • The site is entirely static HTML except for the map, which is JavaScript produced by a PHP program. Only fully static pages will be considered (for reasons of simplicity, security, and speed).
  • The entire site uses the same CSS style sheet to produce a uniform look and feel. Contributed pages must use it too by including the following HTML statement in the <head>:
      <link href="/evp2006/style.css" type="text/css" rel="stylesheet">
    
  • A prototype Web page that can be edited can be found here. It can be edited to add the content.
  • Keep things clear and simple. An example of the HTML to produce a simple table is given below.
    <hr>
      <h1>Previous Senate Elections</h1>
    <hr>
    <p>Senators have been elected by popular vote since 1914, ...
    <table border="1" cellspacing="0" summary="Sixth year Senate elections">
    <tr>
       <td class="medium-3Rb"> Year</td> 
       <td class="medium-3Rb"> Dem</td>
       <td class="medium-3Rb"> GOP</td>
       <td class="medium-3Rb"> Other</td>
    
       <td class="medium-3Rb"> D change</td>
       <td class="medium-3Rb"> R change</td>
       <td class="medium-3Rb"> President</td>
       <td class="medium-3Rb"> Loss</td>
    </tr>
    
    <tr>
    <td class="medium-3R"> 1998</td>
    <td class="medium-3R"> 45</td>
    <td class="medium-3R"> 55</td>
    <td class="medium-3R"> 0</td>
    <td class="medium-3R"> 0</td>
    <td class="medium-3R"> 0</td>
    <td class="medium-2"> Clinton</td>
    <td class="medium-3R"> 0</td>
    </tr>
    
    <tr>
    <td class="medium-3R"> 1986</td>
    <td class="medium-3R"> 55</td>
    <td class="medium-3R"> 45</td>
    <td class="medium-3R"> 0</td>
    <td class="medium-3R"> 8</td>
    <td class="medium-3R"> -8</td>
    <td class="medium-2"> Reagan</td>
    <td class="medium-3R"> 8</td>
    </tr>
    <br>...<br>
    </table>
    
  • Verifiable actual information is welcome, Partisanship is not. For example, a page on Senate history or an explanation of some of the more exotic nomenclature used in the Senate, or a list of the all-time greatest fillibusters might work but not a page on why senator so-and-so sucks. I have software to convert .csv files consisting of 50 lines, one per state, each followed by two numbers, into red/blue maps.

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absentee ballot for overseas voter